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puc reducks

BUMS' LIBRARY: WHAT ARE YOU READING?

Right now, I'm early into The Anatomy of Deception, A Novel of Suspense, by Lawrence Goldstone.

Set in 1889 Philadelphia, it's a truly gruesome look at autopsies/forensics  and the doctors who performed them at the city hospital's "Dead House"--despite the disgust of the public, who viewed such scientists as "grave robbers" and social pariahs.

VERY British-y, moody, atmospheric, creepy--precise and proper dialogue and late Victorian mores rule, making this murder mystery tremendous fun!

~~~~~

After that, I expect to launch into the series of Southwestern mysteries written by Margaret Coel and recommended by an old school chum with whom I've just reconnected.  If Coel is as good as Tony Hillerman or James Doss, well...  I'll be the proverbial happy clam in high tide!
Mac IX

I am reading (and have been) The World is Flat by Thomas Friedman.  

His premise is that modern communications has completely changed the world, making it much "flatter" and things all as close as your keyboard.  The recent (on going) business in Egypt being a good example.  This wouldn't have happened or been possible without modern communications.

I'm a little surprised that the Tea Party group isn't taking more credit for both the uprising in Egypt and Tunisia.  It would seem to me that they are closely related.  The Tea Party showed that even in the sedate two party United States a minor uprising had been created though modern communications.  The same thing is now going on Middle East style and succeeded in toppling the regime in Egypt.

It is closely related and I'm awe struck that the Tea Party isn't taking credit.
puc reducks

That book came out a couple/few years ago, didn't it?  Talk about prescient....  Enjoy Friedman's columns lots.

Tonight on "60 Minutes" the Egyptian Google employee who started the Khaled Said (he was killed by Mubarak's goons) Facebook page, which in turn engendered use of other social networks that got the populace out to Tahrir Square, said essentially, "Any dictator who isn't afraid of the power of the internet and social networks is an idiot."

Please let's keep this thread to books.  There are a gazillion political threads on Bums. Don't mean to be picky, but...  well...

How are you liking the book?
coebul

Good thread Puc

At the moment I am reading "All the Devils are here".  A fairly detailed account of how the Investment Banking industry in conjunction with practices of the Subprime Housing market brought this country to the brink of disaster.  

The next book on the short list is "Ratification"
coebul

Mac IX wrote:

I'm a little surprised that the Tea Party group isn't taking more credit for both the uprising in Egypt and Tunisia.  It would seem to me that they are closely related.  The Tea Party showed that even in the sedate two party United States a minor uprising had been created though modern communications.  The same thing is now going on Middle East style and succeeded in toppling the regime in Egypt.

It is closely related and I'm awe struck that the Tea Party isn't taking credit.
That is because your adoration of all thing 0bama.  Many on both sided of the isle credit him with Egypt as well as Tunisia, Yemen and Jordan.
Mac IX

Coe, your reply seems to be in direct opposition to my post (which didn't have a damn thing to do with Obama).  I think the tea party played a very big, albeit indirect part in the whole thing.  They showed what could be accomplished. I'm surprised they aren't taking more credit.

I think the best thing Obama did with each of these (so far) is AT LEAST PUBLICLLY stay out of them.  He kept a very neutral stance and in fact, seems to have done background work to ease Mubarak out. This sure as hell has not been the policy of ANY past U.S. administrations who did everything possible to keep him in.

Obama stayed neutral to the point that the Saudis are pissed at him for his lack of support and since they are specifically vulnerable, that isn't surprising.
coebul

Mac IX wrote:
Coe, your reply seems to be in direct opposition to my post (which didn't have a damn thing to do with Obama).  I think the tea party played a very big, albeit indirect part in the whole thing.  They showed what could be accomplished. I'm surprised they aren't taking more credit.
Mac pay the post no mind, while a do believe 0bama is as much to blame for the events in Egypt I was really just twisting a cats tail.  I don't think the Tea Party is given a second thought in Egypt.  But who knows?  

Mac IX wrote:
I think the best thing Obama did with each of these (so far) is AT LEAST PUBLICLLY stay out of them.  He kept a very neutral stance and in fact, seems to have done background work to ease Mubarak out. This sure as hell has not been the policy of ANY past U.S. administrations who did everything possible to keep him in.
The "one" thing 0bama didn't do was to play it neutral.  From the beginning he and his administration has pretty much sided with the populous.  Not once can I remember him saying hey people Mubarak is a friend of our and you need to back off.  

Mac IX wrote:
Obama stayed neutral to the point that the Saudis are pissed at him for his lack of support and since they are specifically vulnerable, that isn't surprising.
The Saudi Royal Family is pissed because he supported the populous and not Mubarak.  That has them scared.  As they should be.  

I wonder, and to some extent, how much the Muslim Brotherhood had to do with this and where they will land as this shakes out.  

I am a strong supporter of democracy.......  But I wonder if those that overturned the Shaw of Iran envisioned changing one oppressive for another?  

==========

But we need to take this to another thread.  Cause I would like to keep this about books.  Although I would change the name from "what you are reading" to what you are have and want to read...
bieramar

Re-reading for the 2nd time December 6: A Novel, by Martin Cruz Smith.

His research into historical detail is fantastic and his expressions of human cognitive dissonance excruciatingly accurate - and I did not correctly anticipate the ending!

Each time I read it, I perceive nuances missed previously.

His other books ain't bad, neither; Gorky Park, Rose, Stallion Gate, Polar Star.
puc reducks

bieramar wrote:
Re-reading for the 2nd time December 6: A Novel, by Martin Cruz Smith.

His research into historical detail is fantastic and his expressions of human cognitive dissonance excruciatingly accurate - and I did not correctly anticipate the ending!

Each time I read it, I perceive nuances missed previously.

His other books ain't bad, neither; Gorky Park, Rose, Stallion Gate, Polar Star.


MCS is one of my faves, too!  Loved Gorky Park!  And have read Rose and Polar Star.

So many books, huh?  Am putting December 6 on The List.  Is it about Pearl Harbor?

Although I don't much care for movies made from books, I won't forget Lee Marvin as the villain in GP!

A little off on subject, but not as far as you guys:  Have you seen the movie "RED"?  (For "Retired Extremely Dangerous.")  Bruce Willis, Morgan Freeman, John Malkovich, Helen Mirren as former spooks/black ops who were involved in a "thing" in Guatemala. Suddenly, everyone involved in The Guatemalan Thing is being offed. They go after Willis (John Moses) and the fun begins. Nice plot!!!  I recommend it if you haven't yet seen it!  (There's also a Russian love interest for Mirren... she was suspected of being unloyal and was told to kill The Russian, her soul mate.  She shot him--three times in the chest, leaving him for dead.  He joins the gang, too.  And confides to John:  "I always knew she loved me. She shot me in the chest, not the head."
puc reducks

coebul wrote:
Good thread Puc

At the moment I am reading "All the Devils are here".  A fairly detailed account of how the Investment Banking industry in conjunction with practices of the Subprime Housing market brought this country to the brink of disaster.  

The next book on the short list is "Ratification"


Why, thank you, Coebul!  Very Happy
coebul

Haven't seen "RED" but plan to.  I here it is good.  I like the cast.
auntmartymoo

Loved Red!

Wish I was reading something right now...not a lot of time for recreation in my life these days.

Great thread, though!  Carry on.
auntmartymoo

P.S. Whenever I do have the time, I usually re-read something from my high school reading list...

To Kill a Mockingbird, Catcher in the Rye, Huckleberry Finn...
bieramar

auntmartymoo wrote:
...from my high school reading list... To Kill a Mockingbird, Catcher in the Rye, Huckleberry Finn...


Ouch! Only Huckleberry Finn was in print for my high school reading list!
auntmartymoo

That's right...your list only had the Pyramid Texts, the Bible & Beowulf.

Wink  Wink  Wink  Wink  Wink
scrutney

auntmartymoo wrote:
P.S. Whenever I do have the time, I usually re-read something from my high school reading list...

To Kill a Mockingbird


which moves you to the front of the class as far as puc is concerned.

i'm still on a terry pratchett binge.
there's no point in mentioning what book i'm on...as i didn't read them in order...there is no order in that chaotic mess but they are incredibly funny.

Quote:
Loved Red!


red was okay...i bought it, i'll watch it again...nuff said.

it is a good thread, puc.

i just happen to be reading nothing of any importance right now.
puc reducks

auntmartymoo wrote:
P.S. Whenever I do have the time, I usually re-read something from my high school reading list...

To Kill a Mockingbird, Catcher in the Rye, Huckleberry Finn...


TKAM and CITR... you have hit upon my most favorite book of all time (TKAM) and another (CITR) that is up there in the Top 5.  (Oh, I see Scrutney beat me to it! Great memory!  Very Happy )

Love Mark Twain, but have not really enjoyed re-reading his books as much as I thought.

~~~~~
AMM, regarding RED... did you recognize Richard Dreyfuss???  Even after he was pointed out to me and I stared at him, I saw no trace of him.  Has he had "work"???  Shocked
puc reducks

bieramar wrote:
auntmartymoo wrote:
...from my high school reading list... To Kill a Mockingbird, Catcher in the Rye, Huckleberry Finn...


Ouch! Only Huckleberry Finn was in print for my high school reading list!


Awww...  Still, I'm sure all those cuneiform tablets of your high school years made for excellent reading!  Wink
puc reducks

scrutney wrote:
auntmartymoo wrote:
P.S. Whenever I do have the time, I usually re-read something from my high school reading list...

To Kill a Mockingbird


which moves you to the front of the class as far as puc is concerned.

i'm still on a terry pratchett binge.
there's no point in mentioning what book i'm on...as i didn't read them in order...there is no order in that chaotic mess but they are incredibly funny.

Quote:
Loved Red!


red was okay...i bought it, i'll watch it again...nuff said.

it is a good thread, puc.

i just happen to be reading nothing of any importance right now.


If you're reading it, it is of importance! To some degree or another!

I understand about binge reading authors.  I did that with Elizabeth Peters (an Egyptologist who also wrote scads of historically accurate Victorian-era archaeology mysteries... BEFORE Indiana Jones was popular).

Shall I start the movie thread???
bieramar

I'm a third of the way into He Shall Thunder In The Sky by Elizabeth Peters as you read this.
coebul

puc reducks wrote:


If you're reading it, it is of importance! To some degree or another!
Daffy Duck comic books?

If you say so!
puc reducks

bieramar wrote:
I'm a third of the way into He Shall Thunder In The Sky by Elizabeth Peters as you read this.


Never would've guessed that one!

Are you reading them sequentially?

Amelia here lent Elizabeth's first one of the series out and it was never returned!

I had a real Radcliffe rant at that!  Laughing
puc reducks

coebul wrote:
puc reducks wrote:


If you're reading it, it is of importance! To some degree or another!
Daffy Duck comic books?

If you say so!


Heck, why not?

Do they still print those???  Shocked
bieramar

puc reducks wrote:
bieramar wrote:
I'm a third of the way into He Shall Thunder In The Sky by Elizabeth Peters as you read this.
Never would've guessed that one! Are you reading them sequentially?


Nope, nothing sequential about my reading habits (or my life for that matter, except for the seconds ticking).

My Egyptologist mentor in graduate studies* would figuratively tear his hear out in protest of what he termed my "undisciplined reading habits," as I was a 'pica de flora' when wandering the stacks.

Since the 1940s I've read or re-read 5-10 books a week, but since a botched eye surgery a few years ago am down to about 4 a week.  

On my weekly treks to the public library I don't look at author's names or titles - I pick a book of a shelf and read the first paragraph and trust my reaction to take or leave; then to the next shelf and the same process until I've gathered half a dozen.

*Aquinas Institute of Ecumenical Theology, run by Dominicans, with international scholars of all faiths or no faith, and many nationalities. My frustrated mentor was from the Ecole Biblique in Israel.  
My undergraduate degree is Classical Languages and Literature, hence my interest in Egypt, archeology and ancient sites - many of which I walked during my ten years in Naval Aviation in Europe, Africa and SW Asia before I went to college.
puc reducks

bieramar wrote:
puc reducks wrote:
bieramar wrote:
I'm a third of the way into He Shall Thunder In The Sky by Elizabeth Peters as you read this.
Never would've guessed that one! Are you reading them sequentially?


Nope, nothing sequential about my reading habits (or my life for that matter, except for the seconds ticking).

My Egyptologist mentor in graduate studies* would figuratively tear his hear out in protest of what he termed my "undisciplined reading habits," as I was a 'pica de flora' when wandering the stacks.

Since the 1940s I've read or re-read 5-10 books a week, but since a botched eye surgery a few years ago am down to about 4 a week.  

On my weekly treks to the public library I don't look at author's names or titles - I pick a book of a shelf and read the first paragraph and trust my reaction to take or leave; then to the next shelf and the same process until I've gathered half a dozen.

*Aquinas Institute of Ecumenical Theology, run by Dominicans, with international scholars of all faiths or no faith, and many nationalities. My frustrated mentor was from the Ecole Biblique in Israel.  

My undergraduate degree is Classical Languages and Literature, hence my interest in Egypt, archeology and ancient sites - many of which I walked during my ten years in Naval Aviation in Europe, Africa and SW Asia before I went to college.


Re Elizabeth Peters:  That way, you don't get to see Ramses as a child, nor learn how Amelia and Radcliffe met.  I know series reading isn't for anyone, but I like to see character development.

As a child, I used to like to read by library shelf/subject.  Now it's whatever gul-durn strikes me, altho' if I find someone I enjoy, I'm likely to read another by that author--but not always.  I'm in the midst of getting a "period mystery fix."  And that means Victorian era.

What is "pica de flora"?  Similar to "elite de fauna"?   Laughing

One wonders about the freedom you enjoyed as you walked those ancient sites. Surely, those days are gone for good. What an experience!

Did you learn to read glyphs?  I dabbled with a few classes here and there--Egyptian and Mayan.  It's a world apart to think/comprehend that way.

My studies were unsequential:  I learned just to learn and didn't bother all that much with details like matriculation, etc.  I wanted to understand people so that I could write.  What a journey that was!  Very Happy  

I really am so sorry to learn about your botched eye surgery. Can relate.  I was left with permanent Bell's rings (long, stringy, thin floaters that move constantly) in both eyes after cataract surgery. Think about 5% of patients get it, and for most it goes away in 9-12 months. Not ME, of course.  (The major reason I have a nook, by B&N.)  Was supposed to have "crystal vision."

Had always said if I was forced to choose one or the other, I'd prefer deafness to blindness.  Can always "hear" music you've known in your heard, but you can never, never know the nuances of new words on a page.
tsiya

i've about exhausted the supply at Betty Griffin, of stuff I'll read for pleasure anyway.

I would as soon watch Oprah as read a Harlequin Romance! Very Happy

I don't like medical mysteries, who the Hell wants to read about someone's pickled gall bladder?

Fantasy has to be at least a little believable, a lot of the new stuff exceeds my stretch limits!

If any of you do happen to go to Betty Griffin how about moving all the books on the bottom shelf up a couple of levels, and move some of the upper level books down to the bottom? If I get down on the damned floor trying to read titles I may not be able to get up again!
Very Happy
puc reducks

tsiya wrote:
i've about exhausted the supply at Betty Griffin, of stuff I'll read for pleasure anyway.

I would as soon watch Oprah as read a Harlequin Romance! Very Happy

I don't like medical mysteries, who the Hell wants to read about someone's pickled gall bladder?

Fantasy has to be at least a little believable, a lot of the new stuff exceeds my stretch limits!

If any of you do happen to go to Betty Griffin how about moving all the books on the bottom shelf up a couple of levels, and move some of the upper level books down to the bottom? If I get down on the damned floor trying to read titles I may not be able to get up again!
Very Happy


Where is that thrift shop?

At Goodwill this past weekend, there were "billions and billions" (quoting Carl Sagan) of books EVERYWHERE!!!  Not only the usual book cases, but all along the tops of shelves of clothing!!!  Never seen that many there.

I read ONE Harlequin ONCE, just to see.  Wretched.  Almost as bad as Louis L'Amour.  Could dialogue get any less real or more repetitive???  Shocked

And how many medical mysteries have you read?  I bet you'd like 'em just fine!  Wink   Trust me, "pickled gallbladders" are the least of it!
tsiya

It's at the corner of 312 and AIA, in the old mall behind Jackson's vet clinic. They have a humongus supply of paperbacks and lots of hardcovers too, for the elite shoppers! Very Happy  Better prices than Goodwill too!
They have another store on 13, up in Fruit Cove, haven't checked that one out yet, and it's really upsetting me! Crying or Very sad
bieramar

puc reducks wrote:
Re Elizabeth Peters:  That way [not reading in consecutive order], you don't get to see Ramses as a child, nor learn how Amelia and Radcliffe met.  I know series reading isn't for anyone, but I like to see character development.


Reading a new book for me is like meeting someone for the first time. Most are interacted with for the duration of the one time meeting; but with some from the first page, or eye contact, you know that if you choose there will be many more meetings, and with each new book and meeting you'll learn more. Sort of retrospective character development.  

puc reducks wrote:
What is "pica de flora"?


A Costa Rican (Tica) idiom referring to a person whom like a hummingbird flits from one flower to another.  Usually refers to a handsome Latin male humming around dark-eyed senoritas y senoras,  but also with the derivative meaning as I used the term.   

puc reducks wrote:
One wonders about the freedom you enjoyed as you walked those ancient sites. Surely, those days are gone for good. What an experience!


During one six months deployment in 1957 on the aircraft carrier USS Forrestal we stopped in every major seaport on the Mediterranean. I was abstaining from alcohol, and my buddy and I took every historical and archeological tour available when we had liberty to leave the ship.  His dad was a wealthy industrialist who provided us a 16mm camera, unlimited film, and research credentials which opened many doors to inner sanctums.  That's when I fell in love with the history of western civilization.    

puc reducks wrote:
Did you learn to read glyphs?


I had some introductory overviews, but getting classical Greek and Latin and modern German under my belt kept me busy.  

puc reducks wrote:
My studies were unsequential:  I learned just to learn and didn't bother all that much with details like matriculation, etc.

I took the B.A. simply as a door-opener for later in my work life, but passed on subsequent degrees as I didn't want to be burdened with door-closers as being viewed as "too educated" or as possessing a "profession" (other than meatcutter, which I apprenticed as when a teenager).  
scrutney

puc reducks wrote:
coebul wrote:
puc reducks wrote:


If you're reading it, it is of importance! To some degree or another!
Daffy Duck comic books?

If you say so!


Heck, why not?

Do they still print those???  Shocked


okay...it's not daffy duck.
it's donald duck and uncle scrooge.

from the 40's to the early 60's.
the artist and writer's name is carl barks.

and i have a small collection of the originals and most of them are worth several hundred dollars.

when i sold my comic collection back in the early 80's (and i made a killing) the only thing i saved were the ducks.

and i have several really cool coffee table books, printed on expensive glossy paper, that reprint some of the best.

there.
my dirty secret out on the net for public consumption.

i feel so cheap.
tsiya

bieramar wrote:
puc reducks wrote:
Re Elizabeth Peters:  That way [not reading in consecutive order], you don't get to see Ramses as a child, nor learn how Amelia and Radcliffe met.  I know series reading isn't for anyone, but I like to see character development.


Reading a new book for me is like meeting someone for the first time. Most are interacted with for the duration of the one time meeting; but with some from the first page, or eye contact, you know that if you choose there will be many more meetings, and with each new book and meeting you'll learn more. Sort of retrospective character development.  

puc reducks wrote:
What is "pica de flora"?


A Costa Rican (Tica) idiom referring to a person whom like a hummingbird flits from one flower to another.  Usually refers to a handsome Latin male humming around dark-eyed senoritas y senoras,  but also with the derivative meaning as I used the term.   

puc reducks wrote:
One wonders about the freedom you enjoyed as you walked those ancient sites. Surely, those days are gone for good. What an experience!


During one six months deployment in 1957 on the aircraft carrier USS Forrestal we stopped in every major seaport on the Mediterranean. I was abstaining from alcohol, and my buddy and I took every historical and archeological tour available when we had liberty to leave the ship.  His dad was a wealthy industrialist who provided us a 16mm camera, unlimited film, and research credentials which opened many doors to inner sanctums.  That's when I fell in love with the history of western civilization.    

puc reducks wrote:
Did you learn to read glyphs?


I had some introductory overviews, but getting classical Greek and Latin and modern German under my belt kept me busy.  

puc reducks wrote:
My studies were unsequential:  I learned just to learn and didn't bother all that much with details like matriculation, etc.

I took the B.A. simply as a door-opener for later in my work life, but passed on subsequent degrees as I didn't want to be burdened with door-closers as being viewed as "too educated" or as possessing a "profession" (other than meatcutter, which I apprenticed as when a teenager).  


Yeah, Chuck, you read all that erudite stuff, you'd be outta luck at Betty Griffin. The people who buy your books new don't ever give them away, unless they bequeath them to the Smithsonian! Very Happy  The books I read aren't ever bequeathed, your widow will just throw the damned things in the trash when you die, or give them to Betty Griffin! Shocked
scrutney

Quote:
I read ONE Harlequin ONCE, just to see.  Wretched.  Almost as bad as Louis L'Amour.  Could dialogue get any less real or more repetitive???


"oh manuel, i fear you have ripped the bodice of my dress", she sighed.

manuel the gardener, promptly dropped his load of potatoes, adjusted his cod-piece and fixed lady fitzwilly-smythington with a steely glance from his ice cold blue eyes.

"the garden is bounteous, milady."

"not nearly as bounteous as that cornucopia in your trousers, you lascivious latin lothario."

"carpe diem, milady"

as the swirling mists of passion encircled our turgid twosome...

tune in tomorrow for another installment of:

"love's passionate splendor"
tsiya

That sounds pretty damned erudite to me, or something like that! Very Happy

You can always tell, when you open a book to any page and the big words are no more that 6 letters, and printed in a large font, well, you put that one back on the shelf!
puc reducks

Scrut,
First a nook, now duck comics.   Shocked

Where will it end for you?  Badly, I'm afraid.

It's all so very, very sad.   Crying or Very sad

*sniff*
puc reducks

scrutney wrote:
Quote:
I read ONE Harlequin ONCE, just to see.  Wretched.  Almost as bad as Louis L'Amour.  Could dialogue get any less real or more repetitive???


"oh manuel, i fear you have ripped the bodice of my dress", she sighed.

manuel the gardener, promptly dropped his load of potatoes, adjusted his cod-piece and fixed lady fitzwilly-smythington with a steely glance from his ice cold blue eyes.

"the garden is bounteous, milady."

"not nearly as bounteous as that cornucopia in your trousers, you lascivious latin lothario."

"carpe diem, milady"

as the swirling mists of passion encircled our turgid twosome...

tune in tomorrow for another installment of:

"love's passionate splendor"


OK if we do a multi-authored serial novel???

The lord of the manor, Lord Fitzwilly-Smythington (who was called simply, "Willy," or more often and behind his back "Little Willy"), appeared, crawling on his hands and knees through Manuel's magnificently maintained potato patch.

"Unhand Lady Bedelia," Lord Willy roared, raising a muddied fist to the Heavens.  "You foul and treacherous beast!  You pica de flora!  You forget too soon our week of passionate splendor in Provence, Manuelito!"

Manuel's eyes never lifted to face his accuser.  Instead, he was riveted, not by milady's huge, heaving porcelain bosoms, but by the designer tag, which read, "Hecho en Paris" and sat at the cusp of her...
puc reducks

tsiya wrote:
It's at the corner of 312 and AIA, in the old mall behind Jackson's vet clinic. They have a humongus supply of paperbacks and lots of hardcovers too, for the elite shoppers! Very Happy  Better prices than Goodwill too!
They have another store on 13, up in Fruit Cove, haven't checked that one out yet, and it's really upsetting me! Crying or Very sad


Yup, know that place behind the vet's.  Didn't know the place had a thrift shop.  And better used book prices than Goodwill?  I'm there.   Very Happy

Can't remember the last time I was out Fruit Cove way!  No reason, just haven't been.

Same as Molasses Junction.  Do you remember old Mr. Pursley (think I'm spelling it right)?  That was the coolest  place ever!  All those preserves and such put up, esp. something called Cabbage Relish.  His daughters were neat, too.  I got some of those old aqua glass transformers there once to use as bookends (paperbacks on a sided shelf).  Glad we got to experience that before it vanished.
tsiya

Mike Mulligan, Bernie Bailey and I were out hunting ducks up at the head of Tocoi Creek one day. We were in Edgar Mulligans old flatbed  47 Dodge truck from the fruit stand. Coming out of the William's farm property a cottonmouth about 4 feet long was crossing the road. I jumped out and caught it so I could sell it to the gator farm. I didn't have a bag, had to sit on the back and hold the snake. Before we made 214 damned if I didn't catch a rattler about the same size, had to get Mike or Bernie to pin it with a stick so I could grab it with one hand already full.

We got to Molasses Junction, me still sitting at the edge of the truck bed, a snake in each hand. Mike went in the store and asked Mrs. Pursley if we could have a croaker sack. She asked what we needed a croaker sack for and Mike told her "Bob needs one to put his snakes in".
She gave us a sack, said don't bring it back, and that lady looked at me funny until the last time I saw her, like I might still be holding those snakes!

Oh, don't ever try to sell a Coachwhip to the gator farm, they never want one of those again!. Craziest snake God ever made, good thing they aren't poison! Very Happy

Hell, y'all just think I'm crazy now! Shocked
puc reducks

tsiya wrote:
Mike Mulligan, Bernie Bailey and I were out hunting ducks up at the head of Tocoi Creek one day. We were in Edgar Mulligans old flatbed  47 Dodge truck from the fruit stand. Coming out of the William's farm property a cottonmouth about 4 feet long was crossing the road. I jumped out and caught it so I could sell it to the gator farm. I didn't have a bag, had to sit on the back and hold the snake. Before we made 214 damned if I didn't catch a rattler about the same size, had to get Mike or Bernie to pin it with a stick so I could grab it with one hand already full.

We got to Molasses Junction, me still sitting at the edge of the truck bed, a snake in each hand. Mike went in the store and asked Mrs. Pursley if we could have a croaker sack. She asked what we needed a croaker sack for and Mike told her "Bob needs one to put his snakes in".  

She gave us a sack, said don't bring it back, and that lady looked at me funny until the last time I saw her, like I might still be holding those snakes!

Oh, don't ever try to sell a Coachwhip to the gator farm, they never want one of those again!. Craziest snake God ever made, good thing they aren't poison! Very Happy

Hell, y'all just think I'm crazy now! Shocked



Never did meet Mrs. Pursley, but if her daughters were any indication, I think that (looking at you funny) is totally Mrs. P!

I could understand a large black snake, or a nice grass snake or two, but, no, you had to hog-tie a moccasin and a rattler! How'd they get along together in that sack?   Shocked  Shocked  Shocked

Coachwhips are hard to come upon, from what I recall of my Fla. Park Svc. days.  They prefer to be out of human company.  My boss at the time watched two Coachwhips mating--he had a video--the darndest thing I ever saw:  they formed a complete circle, like a wheel, and kept rolling all over the clearing.  Guess it got the job done!  Wink

Didn't know the Gator Farm bought snakes.  Still???  

Great story, Bob!  Liked that Mrs. P didn't want that sack back!!!
tsiya

You have to have a bunch of permits  to catch and sell now,, another government intrusion!
Many years ago a coachwhip got loose in the gator farm, found it's way into the ladies room and I was told that the coachwhip and 3 ladies ran amok in there and did considerable damage. Seems like all 4 of them wanted out of there and couldn't find the door fast enough. Coachwhips are sort of fiesty, really bad attitude! Smile  If they were venomous they would make Cobtas seem benign.
I covered part my gas money running back and forth to the Palatka SJRCC campus catching snakes along 207. I had a Honda CB400F with a metal box on the rack marked "danger, venomous reptiles". No one messed with my motorcycle! Very Happy
puc reducks

tsiya wrote:
You have to have a bunch of permits  to catch and sell now,, another government intrusion!
Many years ago a coachwhip got loose in the gator farm, found it's way into the ladies room and I was told that the coachwhip and 3 ladies ran amok in there and did considerable damage. Seems like all 4 of them wanted out of there and couldn't find the door fast enough. Coachwhips are sort of fiesty, really bad attitude! Smile  If they were venomous they would make Cobtas seem benign.

I covered part my gas money running back and forth to the Palatka SJRCC campus catching snakes along 207. I had a Honda CB400F with a metal box on the rack marked "danger, venomous reptiles". No one messed with my motorcycle! Very Happy


I don't even want to know HOW the coachwhip got out of its enclosure.  One of my phobic fears is that a Katrina-strength hurricane hits SA and EVERYTHING residing at the Alligator Farm gets free.  Imagine that one.  Think of the breeding...  I think the AF must have a disaster plan, but seriously for a Cat 4 or 5, that'll be no help.

Cobras are a sick fascination of mine.  King and Spitting.

Why were there riches of snakes on the SJRCC campus in Palatka?  

So, all the snakes in the same sack and into the metal box?

Yeah, I wouldn't have gone within a mile of your Honda!  Very Happy
tsiya

Used to be lots of snakes along 207 early in the morning hunting frogs in the ditches. I saved a lot of frogs! Very Happy
puc reducks

tsiya wrote:
Used to be lots of snakes along 207 early in the morning hunting frogs in the ditches. I saved a lot of frogs! Very Happy


Some frogs' legs, a little white wine... bet those snakes were blissed out!  Very Happy
bieramar

A new jewel topping the crown of newly published book reviewing publications; NOT driven by sales or advertisers:
http://www.washingtonindependentreviewofbooks.com/

Reviews are posted between 30 to 45 days of the book publishing.
coebul

What am I reading?  Good question!  At the moment I have 3 books I am working on and just finished two short "mindless" bang, bang shoot-em ups.

I am finishing up the last 50 pages of "All the Devils are Here", about 200 pages into "Team of Rivals" and started and not sure I will finish soon a bio on Andrew Jackson.  

Need to find another book on the economy.  "Graphtopia" has been recommended.  

For general mindless reading?  Clive Cussler, William Johnstone "Ash" series.
puc reducks

Finished The Anatomy of Deception a week or two ago.  Although I enjoyed the historical personages and history of modern surgery and Johns Hopkins Medical School, I found myself distracted during the read.  If not for the historical stuff, I'd have put it down.

Have been reading Patricia Cornwell's Port Mortuary, her most recent in the Kay Scarpetta series.

On tap: The Monster of Florence, A True Story, by Douglas Preston (with Mario Spezi). Preston moved to a villa in Florence only to discover that the olive grove next to his home was the site of (*drumroll*) a horrific double murder committed by one of the most infamous figures in Italian history--a serial killer who ritually murdered 14 young couples and who has never been caught. Said to be along the lines of Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil and The Devil in the White City, both of which I enjoyed lots and lots.

Also, in nookland, I found a freebie by Pierre Loti, something about Icelandic fishermen.  Forget the title and too lazy to activate the nook to check.  But it's an old story and the first pages were captivating.

OH!  And how could I put him last???  Just rec'd the latest book on Bruce Chatwin, this his letters to various literati and arterati compiled by his wife and someone else.  Just got it Saturday and haven't had a chance to delve. I can't wait to read this book.  It will be like visiting with an old friend. If you read nothing else by him, I highly recommend In Patagonia. His personal story, however, outshines his prose, which is why I am so eager to read his letters.
puc reducks

p.s.
Checked the nook... Pierre Loti's (nom de plume) book is The Iceland Fishermen--a story about the lives of fishermen from Breton.

Thing that drew me to Loti is that his works are pre-Proust. Loti (Julien Viaud) can wring more emotional response from a memory than Marcel.
puc reducks

bieramar wrote:
A new jewel topping the crown of newly published book reviewing publications; NOT driven by sales or advertisers:
http://www.washingtonindependentreviewofbooks.com/

Reviews are posted between 30 to 45 days of the book publishing.


This IS a gem!  If you haven't checked it out yet, you must!!!   Very Happy
scrutney

puc...love your signature line.
i think robert dole said the same thing when viewing nixon.
puc reducks

scrutney wrote:
puc...love your signature line.
i think robert dole said the same thing when viewing nixon.


Am howling!!!  What an image!   Laughing
scrutney

okay so everybody has an opinion about books...and everybody will recommend a book as long as they don't have to buy it for...but how many people will give you a free copy of a book?...no strings attached.

scrut will.

be forewarned, i was laughing so damned hard when i read it, i damned near threw up.

and so...after a build up like that...

one word: wodehouse

puc, you'll love this...promise...(the collected public domain works of p.g. wodehouse are available on your nook...5,000 pages for about $5)...just make sure that when you're browsing to purchase, that the collection includes "right ho, jeeves" and "picadilly jim."...or you can read them on the project gutenberg link (above) for free and adjust the font size on your home computer.
bieramar

Wodehouse - blast from the past!

An uncle had many (maybe all) of his Jeeves' books, and on my family's 4x-a-year visits during WWII I'd bury myself in his library while the adults did whatever they did.
puc reducks

Posting link to PBS video of Christopher Reid's poem, "The Story of Lunch, A Poem," which aired on "Masterpiece Contemporary" last Sunday.

http://video.pbs.org/video/2166681265/

Ordered Reid's book of this poem, thus the connection to this thread!
scrutney

while i haven't finished my 4700 page wodehouse extravaganza, i am currently reading 'east of eden' which i thought i had read but am now confident that i haven't. (anyone who could forget prose that powerful has no soul and i'm pretty sure that i do.)

steinbeck rocks.
scrutney

bieramar wrote:
Wodehouse - blast from the past!

An uncle had many (maybe all) of his Jeeves' books, and on my family's 4x-a-year visits during WWII I'd bury myself in his library while the adults did whatever they did.


'right ho jeeves' has to be the funniest book that i've ever read.

i do all of my serious reading in the evening while lying in bed.
sweet baby was watching a movie, last wednesday night and peeked her head in the bedroom because i almost choked from laughing so hard.

puc reducks

scrutney wrote:
while i haven't finished my 4700 page wodehouse extravaganza, i am currently reading 'east of eden' which i thought i had read but am now confident that i haven't. (anyone who could forget prose that powerful has no soul and i'm pretty sure that i do.)

steinbeck rocks.


Absofreakin'lutely!  Every one seemed better than the last. "Of Mice and Men" and much later "Travels with Charlie."  Cannery Row."  Made me want to visit Salinas, CA.
coebul

Yawn Steinbeck is ok.  Of mice and men was good.  Grapes of Wrath equally ok.
auntmartymoo

Puc wrote:
Made me want to visit Salinas, CA.

Me, too!  

Love Steinbeck!  

However, I wish high school reading lists would start kids out on Steinbeck with something/anything other than The Grapes of Wrath.
puc reducks

auntmartymoo wrote:
Puc wrote:
Made me want to visit Salinas, CA.

Me, too!  

Love Steinbeck!  

However, I wish high school reading lists would start kids out on Steinbeck with something/anything other than The Grapes of Wrath.


Me, too, re The Grapes of Wrath.  That thing at the end.  YUCK.

Did you have to read A Catcher In The Rye?
coebul

I did!  Much better then Steinbeck.

"Stranger in a Strange land"~ Robert Heinlein.  Even better.
puc reducks

coebul wrote:
I did!  Much better then Steinbeck.

"Stranger in a Strange land"~ Robert Heinlein.  Even better.


Heinlein was required reading in your high school??!   Shocked

Man, oh, man, I was born just a tad too early!

(Can you grok it?)
coebul

puc reducks wrote:
coebul wrote:
I did!  Much better then Steinbeck.

"Stranger in a Strange land"~ Robert Heinlein.  Even better.


Heinlein was required reading in your high school??!   Shocked

Man, oh, man, I was born just a tad too early!

(Can you grok it?)
I successfully graduated (for lack of a better word) High School with out ever reading a book.  Required reading?  Surely you jest.  

I was in the Air Force when I finally found books.  But I have read 90% of Heinlein and several other classic Sci Fi authors.  And many of the classics.  But with out doubt Heinlein was better then Steinbeck (IMHO).
scrutney

coebul wrote:
puc reducks wrote:
coebul wrote:
I did!  Much better then Steinbeck.

"Stranger in a Strange land"~ Robert Heinlein.  Even better.


Heinlein was required reading in your high school??!   Shocked

Man, oh, man, I was born just a tad too early!

(Can you grok it?)
I successfully graduated (for lack of a better word) High School with out ever reading a book.  Required reading?  Surely you jest.  

I was in the Air Force when I finally found books.  But I have read 90% of Heinlein and several other classic Sci Fi authors.  And many of the classics.  But with out doubt Heinlein was better then Steinbeck (IMHO).


coe bulldogged a textbook case of dylexia into submission while he was in the airforce...one page at a time, thanks to heinlein...and the dean of science fiction gave me some of the best literary conversations of my college life when my brother and i could finally talk about books.

scrut learned a lot about dogged determination from his brother.

pride may cometh before the fall...but in the winter, pride in your family warms your heart.
puc reducks

My mind IS a sieve, Coe.  Now that you've reminded me, I do recall our extensive discussion about reading--and your coming to it later.

As for who's better, Steinbeck or Heinlein... IMO, I don't think they can be compared.  Each is unique unto his genre (why does that make me think of... genrecide???  Shocked ).  I could read either and be equally as happy.  And have been.

That's the coolest thing to say about a sib, Scrutney.  None of my sisters nor my lone brother is a reader, so discussions as you've enjoyed with Coe are things I can only dream about.

Can a person be math-a-lexic???  
coebul

puc reducks wrote:


Can a person be math-a-lexic???  
Yes!
auntmartymoo

puc reducks wrote:
auntmartymoo wrote:
Puc wrote:
Made me want to visit Salinas, CA.

Me, too!  

Love Steinbeck!  

However, I wish high school reading lists would start kids out on Steinbeck with something/anything other than The Grapes of Wrath.


[size=18]Me, too, re The Grapes of Wrath.  That thing at the end.  YUCK.

Did you have to read A Catcher In The Rye?


YES my high school had it on our summer reading list!  But I had already read it when I was in the 7th grade...it was recommended by my dad.  (It's his favorite.)  Have read it several times since.

My high school had great stuff on our reading lists.  (The first book I ever read off of the school list was To Kill A Mockingbird...still a fave after all these years!) But I usually had the reading tastes of a tomboy back then.  I enjoyed The Catcher in the Rye, Lord of the Flies, Kidnapped, Huck Finn, The Call of the Wild.  My sister was really into the girlie stuff from the Bronte sisters.
auntmartymoo

scrutney wrote:
scrut learned a lot about dogged determination from his brother.

pride may cometh before the fall...but in the winter, pride in your family warms your heart.


Beautiful sentiment.  I feel the same way about my big sis.  Things never came easy to her but she always hammered her way through.  I've always admired her perseverance.  

She paved the way.  So no wonder life was such a breeze for me.
coebul

I will "Endeavor to persevere."  


Thanks Scrutney
jasmine

I am reading "Bag of Bones" by Stephen King.  Although some of his stuff has been redundant over the years, which he admits openly, he has a way of capturing my mind, like no other author.  I am always sitting on the edge of my seat waiting to see where he will take a story.  The first book I ever read of his was "The Shining", which I couldn't put down.  That's when I got hooked on his books.  

Stephen King wrote the novella Rita Hayworth and Shawshank Redemption on which the 1994 movie The Shawshank Redemption is based. It appears with three other novellas in a book called "Different Seasons".

The Bachman Books is a collection of short novels by Stephen King published under the pseudonym Richard Bachman between 1977 and 1982.
jasmine

coebul wrote:
puc reducks wrote:


Can a person be math-a-lexic???  
Yes!


Boy that's me.  When 2 and 2 don't add up to 4, boy am I in trouble.
scrutney

jasmine wrote:
I am reading "Bag of Bones" by Stephen King.  Although some of his stuff has been redundant over the years, which he admits openly, he has a way of capturing my mind, like no other author.  I am always sitting on the edge of my seat waiting to see where he will take a story.  The first book I ever read of his was "The Shining", which I couldn't put down.  That's when I got hooked on his books.  

Stephen King wrote the novella Rita Hayworth and Shawshank Redemption on which the 1994 movie The Shawshank Redemption is based. It appears with three other novellas in a book called "Different Seasons".

The Bachman Books is a collection of short novels by Stephen King published under the pseudonym Richard Bachman between 1977 and 1982.


i love king's early stuff.
i had the pleasure of reading the shining before i saw the movie...that's the good news.
my ex-wife and i were going through an extremely bad time while i was reading the shining and king was so great at drawing a sympathetic character that i found myself siding with jack...

spoiler alert.

right about page 400 i realized that he was going to try and kill his family and up until that point i thought he was the good guy.

and that shocked the crap out of me.

it didn't help much that my ex wife's name is wendy.

early king can get under your skin like no other author.

favorites:
the stand.
the dark half.
it (even though it has the silliest ending ever written.)
christine.
the body (part of the collection "different seasons" that jazz mentioned above...and made into the movie "stand by me".)
rita hayworth and the shawshank redemption (part of the same collection)
the talisman.

then i read insomnia and it...umm...put me to sleep, several times.
ditto with, gerald's game, deloris claiborne, misery, the tommyknockers, and the first half of the dark tower series.

but when he's on his game...no one can touch stephen king.




puc reducks

auntmartymoo wrote:
scrutney wrote:
scrut learned a lot about dogged determination from his brother.

pride may cometh before the fall...but in the winter, pride in your family warms your heart.


Beautiful sentiment.  I feel the same way about my big sis.  Things never came easy to her but she always hammered her way through.  I've always admired her perseverance.  

She paved the way.  So no wonder life was such a breeze for me.


It is heartening, as the eldest, to know that such gratitude exists in a younger sib in a family!!!  I'll just bet you have told her--and I know it made her day/week/month!
scrutney

puc reducks wrote:
auntmartymoo wrote:
scrutney wrote:
scrut learned a lot about dogged determination from his brother.

pride may cometh before the fall...but in the winter, pride in your family warms your heart.


Beautiful sentiment.  I feel the same way about my big sis.  Things never came easy to her but she always hammered her way through.  I've always admired her perseverance.  

She paved the way.  So no wonder life was such a breeze for me.


It is heartening, as the eldest, to know that such gratitude exists in a younger sib in a family!!!  I'll just bet you have told her--and I know it made her day/week/month!


where would willie mays have been without jackie robinson,
and who can say where i'd be without you
to lead the way. ~ dan bern...from the song "oh sister."

jasmine

scrutney wrote:
jasmine wrote:
I am reading "Bag of Bones" by Stephen King.  Although some of his stuff has been redundant over the years, which he admits openly, he has a way of capturing my mind, like no other author.  I am always sitting on the edge of my seat waiting to see where he will take a story.  The first book I ever read of his was "The Shining", which I couldn't put down.  That's when I got hooked on his books.  

Stephen King wrote the novella Rita Hayworth and Shawshank Redemption on which the 1994 movie The Shawshank Redemption is based. It appears with three other novellas in a book called "Different Seasons".

The Bachman Books is a collection of short novels by Stephen King published under the pseudonym Richard Bachman between 1977 and 1982.


i love king's early stuff.
i had the pleasure of reading the shining before i saw the movie...that's the good news.
my ex-wife and i were going through an extremely bad time while i was reading the shining and king was so great at drawing a sympathetic character that i found myself siding with jack...

spoiler alert.

right about page 400 i realized that he was going to try and kill his family and up until that point i thought he was the good guy.

and that shocked the crap out of me.

it didn't help much that my ex wife's name is wendy.

early king can get under your skin like no other author.

favorites:
the stand.
the dark half.
it (even though it has the silliest ending ever written.)
christine.
the body (part of the collection "different seasons" that jazz mentioned above...and made into the movie "stand by me".)
rita hayworth and the shawshank redemption (part of the same collection)
the talisman.

then i read insomnia and it...umm...put me to sleep, several times.
ditto with, gerald's game, deloris claiborne, misery, the tommyknockers, and the first half of the dark tower series.

but when he's on his game...no one can touch stephen king.



Misery got under my skin, that was also a good movie, Kathy Bates and James Caan did an excellent job in the movie.  I also liked Deloris Claiborne.  

I could not get into IT, nor could I get into The Stand, you are right about some of them putting you to sleep.  I think he stopped writing after Christine and Buick 8.  They were really dumb movies and all about possessed cars and he knew after those books, he had to quit for awhile.  

The books are always better than the movies because you use your own imagination rather than a screenwiter's interpretation of the book.  

What I like about King is that his movies, although scarey, are never gory (sp?)

I never thought the guy in Shining was the good guy, he had a huge amount of problems and became obsessed with the past of the hotel.  

Anyway, I love Stephen King.
jasmine

scrutney wrote:
puc reducks wrote:
auntmartymoo wrote:
scrutney wrote:
scrut learned a lot about dogged determination from his brother.

pride may cometh before the fall...but in the winter, pride in your family warms your heart.


Beautiful sentiment.  I feel the same way about my big sis.  Things never came easy to her but she always hammered her way through.  I've always admired her perseverance.  

She paved the way.  So no wonder life was such a breeze for me.


It is heartening, as the eldest, to know that such gratitude exists in a younger sib in a family!!!  I'll just bet you have told her--and I know it made her day/week/month!


where would willie mays have been without jackie robinson,
and who can say where i'd be without you
to lead the way. ~ dan bern...from the song "oh sister."



Nice, although I was the youngest, my brother told me he wished he had my strength to be myself, and I do miss him
scrutney

spoiler alert:


"it" would have been my favorite king book but for the weak ending.

there was a creeping horror to that book that i can't describe and the plot device of having the same people face the same "entity" twice but 25 years apart, was a masterstroke.

and the "derry interludes.", short, sharp, shots of savagery, split over several generations, scared the holy hell out of me.

buuuuut king wrote himself into a corner and had to....i mean...giant space turtles and spiders?

wtf?
jasmine

scrutney wrote:
spoiler alert:


"it" would have been my favorite king book but for the weak ending.

there was a creeping horror to that book that i can't describe and the plot device of having the same people face the same "entity" twice but 25 years apart, was a masterstroke.

and the "derry interludes.", short, sharp, shots of savagery, split over several generations, scared the holy hell out of me.

buuuuut king wrote himself into a corner and had to....i mean...giant space turtles and spiders?

wtf?


That is what is so great about King, he does write himself into a corner, and gets out of it beautifully, there is a lot of a sense of humor in his writing as well as scaring someone to death.  He is a master at whatever he wants to do.
scrutney

nerve.com:

Vatican's Chief Exorcist claims that yoga and Harry Potter are Satanic

Eighty-six-year-old Father Gabriele Amorth knows from exorcisms. Having clocked twenty-five years in the demon-eviction game as Chief Exorcist of the Vatican (appointed by Pope John Paul II), Father Amorth claims to have performed more than 70,000 exorcisms during his tenure. He is the honorary president for life of the International Association of Exorcists, and he even says his favorite movie is...you guessed it, The Exorcist. So if there's anyone better at sniffing out evil, it's news to me.

But speaking at Italy's Umbria Film Festival on Friday, where he was invited to introduce a Sir Anthony Hopkins film about, yes, exorcism called The Rite, the good padre caught some people off-guard by accusing the practice of yoga and the Harry Potter books of being Satanic. Believing that, more than mere exercise, yoga is a slippery slope that leads to the worship of Hinduism, and that "all Eastern religions are based on a false belief in reincarnation," Father Amorth said that "Practicing yoga is Satanic, it leads to evil just like reading Harry Potter. In Harry Potter, the devil acts in a crafty and covert manner, under the guise of extraordinary powers, magic spells, and curses."

The J.K. Rowling books have been accused of having an occultic subtext before, and the Catholic Church seems to have a real problem with yoga. The current pope, Benedict XVI, had previously issued a document in 1999, when he was Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger, stating that "Eastern" practices such as yoga, Zen, and transcendental meditation posed a danger, in that they could "degenerate into a cult of the body" that edged out "the authentic consolations of the Holy Spirit."

Taking the opposite view, and voicing the majority opinion on the subject, Vanda Vanni, founder of the Mediterranean Yoga Association, said:

"It's an accusation that has nothing to do with reality. It's a theory -- if one can call it a theory -- that is totally without foundation. Yoga is not a religion or a spiritual practice. It doesn't have even the slightest connection with Satanism or Satanic sects."

link to story

this guy has performed 70,000 exorcisms in 25 years?
is there a drive-thru involved?
bieramar

scrutney wrote:
this guy has performed 70,000 exorcisms in 25 years?
is there a drive-thru involved?


If he took the Sabboth off, that's averaging about one exorcism per hour during a 9 hour workday - every day for 25 years!

A devilishly busy schedule - as in my experience it takes a good hour for a complete exorcism.

Father Leo Kelm, of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Sioux City, Iowa, performed the rite on me in 1943 after some members of the local church reported to the Bishop that my mom and my using the Ouija Board and "Table Up" tapping parlor games for messaging with husbands, boyfriends and sons overseas in WWII must be a result of demonic possession.  

Fr. Kelm did the exorcism publicly in the St. Cecilia's Academy gynmasium, with the congregation invited to observe. No demons were detected, and I was given a clean bill of spiritual health.
coebul

Or like Reverend Sun Myung Moon who was known for performing mass marriages, this guy could be doing exorcisms em masse.
scrutney

wish me luck.
the grapes of wrath beckons.
followed by the sequels.

the apples of angst.
and the peaches of perdition.
jasmine

scrutney wrote:
wish me luck.
the grapes of wrath beckons.
followed by the sequels.

the apples of angst.
and the peaches of perdition.


So we'll hear from you Christmas, 2014?
auntmartymoo

scrutney wrote:
wish me luck.
the grapes of wrath beckons.

Glutton for punishment.  Surely there's an easier way to achieve deliberate depression.
scrutney

auntmartymoo wrote:
scrutney wrote:
wish me luck.
the grapes of wrath beckons.

Glutton for punishment.  Surely there's an easier way to achieve deliberate depression.


voting for obama springs to mind.
auntmartymoo

Good one!

For more self-imposed depression, also try The Jungle by Upton Sinclair.  

It's the second most depressing book on earth...and as an added bonus... its really hard to read.  The sentences are miles and miles long and the main character speaks Lithuanian.  

SPOILER ALERT:  He starts out poor and keeps getting poorer...and at the end, decides communism is the answer to his problems.
scrutney

auntmartymoo wrote:

For more self-imposed depression, also try The Jungle by Upton Sinclair.  

It's the second most depressing book on earth...and as an added bonus... its really hard to read.  The sentences are miles and miles long and the main character speaks Lithuanian.


i might have to pass on that one.

i may have reached my maximum depression point, at page 126 of the joad family chronicles. they've just slaughtered the family pigs and loaded the truck for their jaunt to cali-for-ni-a, while granpa keeps talkin' bout grapes in the promised land, that he's a gonna smoosh into his face.

i had to quit reading and pour the dust out of my shoes.

and don't get me started on muley graves. (the guy with the haunted eyes.)

i wonder if he ever read grapes of wrath?
coebul

You guys haven't lived until you have less then a week left till finals in Southern Lit 405 Dr Harkey and you find out that oh yes the final will include "Homeward Angle" by Thomas Wolf.   900 pages of the most boring book ever written.  A story about a kid with divorced parents living on the same block.  According to Cliff notes it was a self navel examination of the authors life....  Got 400 pages into it and then finished with Cliff Notes.  


OMG!
auntmartymoo

scrutney wrote:
auntmartymoo wrote:

For more self-imposed depression, also try The Jungle by Upton Sinclair.


i might have to pass on that one.

i may have reached my maximum depression point, at page 126 of the joad family chronicles.

Page 126?  

Sorry.  Depressing things haven't even begun to happen for the Joads yet.  

You should probably keep a Prozac IV handy.
scrutney

auntmartymoo wrote:
Page 126?  

Sorry.  Depressing things haven't even begun to happen for the Joads yet.  

You should probably keep a Prozac IV handy.


you mean it gets worse?

for what it's worth, i've seen the john ford masterpiece "the grapes of wrath" movie so i'm pretty sure that the joads ain't seen nothin' yet.

still, i'm sorta wondering why i'm willingly subjecting myself to this...and the only answer i have is that "east of eden" was just so damn good that i'm hoping to find some kind of redemption...whether it's for me or the joads...hell, i don't know.

maybe i'm taking notes for a soon to be written movie script where the joads hijack a starship and boldly go where no man has gone before.
working title?
the grapes of the wrath of khan.  
scrutney

the grapes of wrath was literally the most depressing thing i've read since the 2008 democratic platform.

since then i've subjected myself to "the lost symbol" by dan brown.
poor writing and crap scinece.

and i am currently reading "team of rivals" by doris kearns goodwin.
bieramar

"Stone Kiss" by Faye Kellerman - one in her series of Peter Decker & Rina Lazurus novels.

"A master of mystery" ~ Cleveland Plain Dealer

"No one working in the crime genre is better" ~ Baltimore Sun  

"Splendid" ~ Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

Cleveland, Baltimore and Milwaukee - what more can I say?
scrutney

this should probably go in the mixed media thread but we were discussing the grapes of wrath here, sooooo...tonight at 8pm turner classic movies is running the john ford classic adaptation.

what steinbeck wrote as a study of "i've been down so damn long that it looks like up to me" and the total humiliation and subsequent objectification of a family shoved through the cracks of society, director john ford turns into a triumph of the human spirit.

an amazing movie, much better than the book from which it was drawn.

as a director, when ford's on his game, no one can touch him.

if you haven't seen it "the grapes of wrath" is not to be missed.
tsiya

Large Naked Woman Stomps On Car In Noe Valley







A woman described as "heavyset" and naked except for her shoes was pulled off the J-Church line on Tuesday morning, and while cops and medical personnel were evaluating her near the intersection of 24th and Church in Noe Valley, she threw off a blanket that had been wrapped around her, walked up on the hood of one man's car, and stomped on his windshield. The man, John Knight, described the crazed woman as about 250 pounds, and he had a lot of explaining to do to his insurance company.
“They asked if the car was on the side of a street or in a parking lot,” says Knight. “I told them, ‘No, a naked woman just got on my hood and stomped on it.’ They didn’t really know what to make of it.”
The woman was hospitalized but it does not seem that she was arrested. Knight says he won't press charges because, well, she's unhinged.

http://sfist.com/2012/02/24/large_naked_woman_stomps_on_car_in.php


I don't know where this is but why doesn't anything interesting ever happen here?
tsiya

Robert Ludlum's ROAD TO GANDOLFO. I read it years ago but it's worth repeating, great story, great tongue in cheek humor.

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