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Afghanistan
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Do you support the Obama administration's current policy in Afghanistan?
Yes
25%
 25%  [ 1 ]
No
75%
 75%  [ 3 ]
Total Votes : 4

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bieramar



Joined: 19 Nov 2010
Posts: 4441
Location: Taylor Ranch, NM

PostPosted: Sat Dec 08, 2012 5:53 pm    Post subject:  Reply with quote

Afghanistan - then, now, and tomorrow?

By Atia Abawi and F. Brinley Bruton, NBC News, December 8, 2012

NEWS ANALYSIS

KABUL, Afghanistan - Many Afghans see dark clouds of uncertainty looming over the calendar as the 2014 deadline approaches for most foreign troops to withdraw, and worry that after that the international community will abandon them.

Over the last decade, billions of aid dollars have flowed into Afghanistan, and thousands of foreign soldiers and tens of thousands of civilians have died during the effort to bring peace and a modicum of prosperity to the country.  Meanwhile, the government of President Hamid Karzai has passed laws meant to improve the lives of his citizens. 

Nevertheless, Afghanistan still faces huge problems, such as widespread violence, official corruption, grinding poverty and a booming narcotics trade.

Security

The Taliban are regaining land and power lost after they were toppled by U.S.-backed forces in 2001.

While there have been more than 2,000 American military casualties during this time, civilians have borne the brunt of the violence. 

In the first six months of 2012 alone, more than 3,000 civilians were killed or injured. This number was down 15 percent from a year earlier.

Anti-government and coalition insurgents were responsible for 80 percent of the civilian casualties, the U.N. says.

Some 130,000 NATO troops in Afghanistan are preparing to withdraw in 2014 and are training and working alongside Afghan soldiers as they take increasing responsibility for the anti-insurgency campaign.

More than 300,000 Afghan National Army soldiers and Afghan National Police members have been trained to replace foreign soldiers. 

Afghan security forces face big challenges, such as attrition, illiteracy and insurgent infiltration.

Poverty and corruption

Most Afghans are not just living in fear of an insurgent attack or NATO airstrike.  They fear hunger and worry that they and their families won't survive another winter.

Afghans are among the poorest people on earth - per capita GDP was around $576 in 2011, up from $158 in 2002. More than half of children under the age of five are malnourished.

Afghanistan remains largely dependent on foreign aid - the World Bank says that 90 percent of the country's national budget is still financed by governments and other foreign organizations.

Along with the huge inflows of foreign aid and poverty is corruption:  the country is tied with Somalia and North Korea at the bottom of the list. It is estimated that Afghans paid $2.5 billion in bribes over 12 months, which is equivalent to almost a quarter of the country's GDP.

Women

In 2001, Afghan women were the poster children for the invasion.  Promises poured in to help half of the society that was brutalized and banished during the Taliban.  

Despite the pledges, Afghanistan remains one of the most difficult places in the world to be a woman: it has one of the highest levels of maternal mortality and, according to U.N. estimates, around 90 percent of women suffer from some sort of domestic abuse. 

Nevertheless, there has been some progress. In 2004, President Karzai signed into law a new constitution granting equality among all its citizens and ensuring women's rights.  And in 2009 the country passed the Elimination of Violence Against Women Law, intended to protect women from abuse, rape, and forced marriages.  While the laws were all positive steps such legislation is rarely enforced. 

The ministry of women's affairs in Kabul says that from April through July of this year at least 3,600 cases of violence against women were recorded.  However, this grim number may be seen as a sign of progress because it means more families and women are learning about their rights and reporting their grievances. 

In the cities, you see women in the workforce again, doctors, politicians and even business owners.

Drugs

Afghanistan has long-produced about 90 percent of the world's opium, a paste from the poppy plant that is mad into make heroin.  At the end of the Taliban's rule, the government worked with the U.N. to cut production.

In the last decade, opium production increased again. It is now the largest source of export earnings and accounts for half of Afghanistan's GDP.

Children

All hope is not lost in Afghanistan, progress has been made in small steps rather than the giant leaps expected when United States-backed forces toppled the Taliban. 

In 2001, girls were denied an education under the Taliban regime and only 900,000 children were enrolled in school throughout Afghanistan. 

Today, at least 7 million children are attending classes and 2.5-million are estimated to be girls, according to Amnesty International.

Still, many fear that these delicate gains will disappear as the last foreign combat troops leave Afghanistan on Dec. 31, 2014. 
                     =====

The first and most important reality which must be accepted before supporting, opposing, or criticizing the tactical efforts of U.S. Operation Enduring Freedom and the NATO ISAF wars in Afghanistan is that NO nation-state has ever successfully defeated a non-state actor motivated by extremist religious or philosophical views.

And nation-states warring with non-state-entities are THE wars of the late 20th and on-going 21st centuries. International law, international agreements, national treaties, national and regional pacts, et al are all useless for the simple reason that they are all founded in the power and authority of the nation-state.

That the U.S. has thousands of active duty generals and admirals, and tens of thousands of combat-proved officers and enlisted men and women doesn't mean squat when it comes to fighting a non-state enemy without geographic boundaries.
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tsiya



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PostPosted: Sat Jan 05, 2013 11:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The sad state called Afghanistan


BY COACH COLLINS, ON JANUARY 5TH, 2013
by Jim Emerson,  staff writer

This week the Taliban said the transfer of U.S. and NATO led security operations to Afghan security forces was similar to America’s retreat from Vietnam by the “declaring victory and run” strategy. The Taliban just needed to learn a little American history to know about the Vietnamization Strategy where the US would train the Afghans to fight their own battles and allow American and NATO to withdrawal with honor. Like the North Vietnamese, the Taliban can already declare victory. Who can blame them with this Administration too busy kowtowing to the Muslim Brotherhood and doing nothing to Iran? Taliban leadership believe that history and time are on their side. (1)

History

American now is repeating the same mistakes the Soviet Union made during their incursion into Afghanistan and, as with the Soviets, no matter the effort expended to modernize the tribal nation it will always fail. Unless the Afghans themselves embrace the West and a better way of life, any effort to improve their own by showing them a better way is a waste of time, money and lives. The initial invasion into Afghanistan was a necessity to eliminate al Qaeda and their Taliban host. Unfortunately, it evolved into a war of choice and nation building. History has proved time and time again it has never worked. (2)

Déjà vu

Former British ambassador to MoscowRodric Braithwaite wrote that the Soviets military “rebuilt and constructed hundreds of schools, technical colleges, over 30 hospitals and a similar number of nursery schools, some 400 apartment buildings and 35 mosques,” and built a modern infrastructure. They were guarding military and civilian installations. As long as the Afghan puppet government was getting support they remained in power. Sound familiar? After the collapse of the Soviet Union, Afghanistan no longer had any outside support. After a series of uprisings the Taliban rose to power and all improvements the Soviets provided went to waste. It won’t take the 1st Century thugs   long to dismantle remaining Western efforts to make their lives easier.

Just like U.S. and NATO forces the Soviet military never lost an engagement to the insurgents but without support from the Afghan population they lost the war. As soon as the Russians withdrew, the country reverted to its quasi-Stone Age existence. It’s a history the Taliban know well and this Administration is too supercilious to acknowledge.

1.       http://abcnews.go.com/Internation...vietnam-war-18111096#.UOTD3IPnaUm
2.       http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/02...es-of-soviet-experience.html?_r=0
3.        

http://www.coachisright.com/the-sad-state-called-afghanistan/
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bieramar



Joined: 19 Nov 2010
Posts: 4441
Location: Taylor Ranch, NM

PostPosted: Sat Jan 05, 2013 5:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jim Emerson, staff writer at CoachIsRight.com wrote:

The sad state called Afghanistan

This week the Taliban said the transfer of U.S. and NATO led security operations to Afghan security forces was similar to America’s retreat from Vietnam by the “declaring victory and run” strategy. The Taliban just needed to learn a little American history to know about the Vietnamization Strategy where the US would train the Afghans to fight their own battles and allow American and NATO to withdrawal with honor. Like the North Vietnamese, the Taliban can already declare victory.

History

American now is repeating the same mistakes the Soviet Union made during their incursion into Afghanistan and, as with the Soviets, no matter the effort expended to modernize the tribal nation it will always fail. Unless the Afghans themselves embrace the West and a better way of life, any effort to improve their own by showing them a better way is a waste of time, money and lives. The initial invasion into Afghanistan was a necessity to eliminate al Qaeda and their Taliban host. Unfortunately, it evolved into a war of choice and nation building. History has proved time and time again it has never worked.

Déjà vu

Former British ambassador to MoscowRodric Braithwaite wrote that the Soviets military “rebuilt and constructed hundreds of schools, technical colleges, over 30 hospitals and a similar number of nursery schools, some 400 apartment buildings and 35 mosques,” and built a modern infrastructure. They were guarding military and civilian installations. As long as the Afghan puppet government was getting support they remained in power. Sound familiar? After the collapse of the Soviet Union, Afghanistan no longer had any outside support. After a series of uprisings the Taliban rose to power and all improvements the Soviets provided went to waste.


Jim Emerson is definitely right in his historical retrospective of Afghanistan during the Bush and Obama administrations' invasion and occupation, and about the earlier Russian invasion and occupation.

But his history is incomplete; and to truly understand the folly of U.S. foreign policy in Afghanistan, and the creation and emergence of the Taliban, and of al Qaeda, the leading non-state organization spreading terror around the world, the following chapters need to be recognized.

- July 3, 1979, Carter signs the first (Top Secret) Presidential Directive for secret aid to the mujahideen, the opponents of the pro-Soviet regime in Kabul. The mujahideen consisted of 7 or 8 groups, who often fought amongst themselves in their battle for territory and control of the opium trade. To hurt the Russians, the U.S. deliberately chose to give the most support to the most extreme groups.

- August 1979, "The United States' larger interest...would be served by the demise of the Taraki-Amin regime, despite whatever setbacks this might mean for future social and economic reforms in Afghanistan." ~ Top Secret State Dept. paper.

- December 1979, The Russians invade Afghanistan.

US Sec'y of Defense Harold Brown visits Beijing China to arrange for a weapons transfer from the Chinese to the ClA-backed Afghani troops mustered in Pakistan. Brown did the same with Egypt (president Anwar Sadat) to buy $15 million worth of weapons.

The US objective was to ensnare the Russians in a quagmire to drain their resources, i.e., give them their own Vietnam. "There were 58,000 dead in Vietnam and we owe the Russians one.... I have a slight obsession with it, because of Vietnam. I thought the Soviets ought to get a dose of it.... I've been of the opinion that this money was better spent to hurt our adversaries than other money in the Defense Department budget." ~ Texas Representative Charlie Wilson.

With the support of Pakistan's military dictator, General Zia-ul-Haq, the U.S. began recruiting and training both mujahideen fighters from the 3 million Afghan refugees in Pakistan and large numbers of mercenaries from other Islamic countries.  

-1981; CIA purchased assault rifles, grenade launchers, mines and SA-7 light antiaircraft weapons (mainly bought from China), and arrangedshipment to Pakistan.

- Between 1982 and 1992, 35,000+ Muslim radical Islamists from 43 Islamic countries in the Middle East, North and East Africa, Central Asia and the Far East were trained and participated in warfare with the CIA assisted Afghan mujahideen. One of the first non-Afghan volunteers was Osama bin Laden, who recruited 4,000+ volunteers from Saudi Arabia, and who, working closely with the CIA, raising money from private Saudi citizens.

- 1983, annual weapons shipments from CIA to Pakistan reaches 10,000 tons.

- 1984, bin Laden ran the Maktab al-Khidamar, an organization set up by the ISI to funnel "money, arms, and fighters from the outside world in the Afghan war."

- March 1985, Reagan's (Top Secret) National Security Decision Directive 16629 escalating covert action in Afghanistan.

- 1985, the CIA began supplying the mujahideen with satellite reconnaissance data of Soviet installations and troops on the Afghan battlefield, plus signals intel of communications.  Also the CIA provided secure communications devices, delayed timers and  tons of C-4 plastic explosives for IEDs and urban terrorism, long-range sniper rifles, targeting devices for mortars directly linked to a USN satellite, wire-guided anti-tank missiles, and much, much more.

- 1986 to 1989; 1,000+ state-of-the-art, shoulder-fired Stinger antiaircraft missiles were sent from the U.S. to the mujahideen.

- 1987; the annual weapon aid from the U.S. reached 65,000 tons, with CIA and Dept. of Defense officials coordinating mujahideen ops with the Pakistani Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI) headquarters in Rawalpindi. Eleven ISI teams operated in Afhanistan, attacking airports, railroads, fuel depots, electricity pylons, bridges and roads. CIA ops officers "advised" Pakistani trainers establishing schools for the mujahideen in secure communications, guerrilla warfare, urban sabotage and heavy weapons.

- 1988 bin Laden created Al Qaeda (English "the base"), quasi independent Islamist terrorist cells in 26+ countries.

- Spring 1989 - The Russians withdrew, from Afghanistan, and different groups of the mujahideen struggled for power, although the last Russian-installed president, Muhammed Najibullah, controlled Kabul.

- April 1992, Kabul fell to some of the mujahideen groups, but civil war continued, and the country disintegrated into isolated fiefdoms dominated by local warlords armed with the foreign-supplied weapons.

- 1994 the Taliban (English "students" in Pashtun), was created, from madrassas funded by the U.S., Britain and Saudi Arabia set up by the Pakistani government along the Afghan/Pakistan border.

Between $3 billion and $6 billion US taxpayers' dollars were spent in the above actions. Millions of dead and maimed, billions of dollars of destruction - all following the immoral idea that "the enemy of my enemy is my friend."
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bieramar



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PostPosted: Mon Apr 22, 2013 9:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Afghanistan - 2013 on track to be very violent year

By Thomas Wagner
The Associated Press
Sunday, April 21, 2013

KABUL, Afghanistan -- Insurgents killed six police officers at a checkpoint and a suicide bomber killed three civilians at a shopping bazaar in separate attacks Sunday in eastern Afghanistan, while an independent security group warned 2013 is on track to be one of the most violent years of the war.

April already has been the deadliest month this year for security forces and Afghan and foreign civilians as the U.S. and other countries prepare to end their combat mission by the end of next year.

According to an Associated Press tally, 222 people have been killed in violence around the nation this month, including Sunday's nine fatalities....

Hostilities have surged in Afghanistan as the spring fighting season begins. This year is being closely watched because Afghan forces must operate with less support from the international military coalition. With foreign forces due to hand over combat responsibilities to the local forces next year, the current fighting is a test of their ability to take on the country's insurgency.

Reflecting the rise in bloodshed, the Afghanistan NGO Safety Office said Sunday there were 2,331 insurgent-initiated attacks in the first quarter of this year (avg. 25+ a day), a 47% increase over the same January-March period last year.

The U.S.-led NATO coalition has stopped releasing statistics on insurgent attacks in Afghanistan.

Afghanistan's Defence Ministry said the Afghan army carried out 2,209 military operations during a monthlong period ending Sunday [avg. 75 a day].

During that time, 467 insurgents and 107 soldiers [plus 12 NATO-ISAF military in other incidents] were killed, and 362 militants were arrested, the Ministry said in a report issued Sunday....

Afghanistan has about 100,000 international troops, including 66,000 from the United States. The U.S. force is to drop to about 32,000 by February 2014....

http://www.ctvnews.ca/world/attac...-to-be-very-violent-year-1.124750
                       ===

So far in 2013 26 U.S. military and 6 other NATO-ISAF military have been killed in Afghanistan.
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bieramar



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PostPosted: Tue Apr 30, 2013 8:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Taliban promise suicide assaults, 'insider attacks' in this year's spring offensive beginning April 28

By Bill Roggio
Long War Journal
April 27, 2013

The Afghan Taliban announced that this year's spring offensive would begin on April 28 and would focus on suicide assaults on Coalition installations, as well as "insider attacks" against Western personnel.

The Taliban, under the guise of the Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan, announced the "'Khalid bin Waleed' spring operation" on their website, Voice of Jihad, today. The offensive is named after a companion of the Prophet Mohammed and military general whose victories helped establish the first caliphate.

The Taliban indicated that the attacks would focus primarily on the "foreign invaders," or Coalition forces operating under the command of the International Security Assistance Forces. The Taliban stressed that they would use "special military tactics" and "collective martyrdom operations," a reference to suicide assaults, and "insider attacks," or green-on-blue attacks, in which Afghan security forces attack ISAF personnel.

"This year's spring operation, in accordance with its combat nature, will consist of special military tactics quantity and quality wise while successful insider attacks, to eliminate foreign invaders, will be carried out by infiltrating Mujahideen inside enemy bases in a systematic and coordinated manner," the Taliban stated.
"Similarly, collective martyrdom operations on bases of foreign invaders, their diplomatic centers and military airbases will be even further structured while every possible tactic will be utilized in order to detain or inflict heavy casualties on the foreign transgressors," the statement continued.

The Taliban carried out several suicide assaults on major ISAF installations last year, including attacks in Kabul and three other provinces just days after announcing the 2012 spring offensive. The Taliban's most successful suicide assault against an ISAF installation took place at Camp Bastion in Helmand province. A 15-man Taliban team penetrated security at the base, destroyed six Marine Harriers and damaged two others, and killed the squadron commander and a sergeant.
Insider, or green-on-blue attacks, spiked last year, with 44 such attacks reported; these attacks accounted for 15% of Coalition deaths. There have been four insider attacks reported so far this year.

The Taliban claimed last August that they had created a "Call and Guidance, Luring and Integration" department to infiltrate Afghan forces or turn personnel against their Western partners.

The Taliban's announcement today also warned Afghans to "stay away from the bases of the invaders, their residential areas or working for them in order to avoid civilian losses." Additionally, the Taliban called on "all the officials and workers of the stooge Karzai regime to break away from this decaying administration."

Finally, the Taliban called on Afghan "religious figures, tribal elders and all the influential figures of society" to discourage men from "joining the ranks of America's mercenary programs (army, police, arbaki [tribal militias])...."

The recent stronger emphasis on the targeting of foreign personnel is an indication that the Taliban are seeking to score a propaganda victory by attacking Coalition personnel as the bulk of forces are withdrawn this year. ISAF is ending combat operations and withdrawing its military forces by the end of 2014 and transferring security responsibility to Afghan forces.
                                    ====

Since the Spring Offensive began on Sunday:
- 76 civilians and police wounded,
- 15 Afghanistan civilians killed (including 2 Afghanistani diplomats),
- 7 U.S. civilian contracters killed (crash of 747-400 aircraft of National Airlines home-based in Orlando),
- 4 U.S. USAF killed (crash of MC-12 surveillance aircraft),
- 3 ISAF troops killed (roadside IED), and
- 2 Afghanistan police killed (roadside IED).

The lack of media coverage of the longest war the United States has ever fought continues to disgust me - as the lack of attention of the great majority of U.S. citizens continues to dismay me.

Since 09/11/01, only 1 of every 88 American men and 1 of every 555 American women have served on military active duty, an extremely small percentage of the population, with their sacrifices ignored (or ridiculed) by many of the rest of the population.
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bieramar



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PostPosted: Wed May 08, 2013 7:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

1. ISAF Announces Investigation
KABUL, Afghanistan (May 8, 2013) – The International Security Assistance Force has initiated an investigation following an internal report of alleged misconduct by ISAF personnel during an engagement that killed four confirmed insurgents April 28 in Zabul Province.
Read more...

2. ISAF Joint Command Operational Update, May 8th
KABUL, Afghanistan (May 8, 2013) – An Afghan and coalition security force arrested a Taliban leader and three other insurgents during an operation in Panjwa'i district, Kandahar province, today.
Read more...

3. ISAF Joint Command Operational Update, May 7th
KABUL, Afghanistan (May 7, 2013) – An Afghan and coalition security force arrested a Taliban leader and three other insurgents during an operation in Lashkar Gah district, Helmand province, today.
Read more...

4. ISAF Joint Command Operational Update, May 6th
KABUL, Afghanistan (May 6, 2013) – An Afghan and coalition security force arrested a senior Taliban leader and one other insurgent during an operation in Khugyani district, Nangarhar province, today.
Read more...

5. ISAF Joint Command Operational Update, May 5th
KABUL, Afghanistan (May 5, 2013) – An Afghan and coalition security force killed a Taliban leader, Qudrat, and arrested four other insurgents during an operation in Dand district, Kandahar province, today.
Read more...

6. ISAF Casualty, May 5th
KABUL, Afghanistan (May 5, 2013) – An International Security Assistance Force service member died following an insurgent attack in northern Afghanistan yesterday.
Read more...

7. ISAF Casualties, May 4th
KABUL, Afghanistan (May 4, 2013) – Two International Security Assistance Force service members were killed when an Afghan National Army soldier turned his weapon against ISAF service members in western Afghanistan today. The incident is currently under investigation.
Read more...

8. ISAF Casualties, May 4th
KABUL, Afghanistan (May 4, 2013) – Five International Security Assistance Force service members died following an improvised explosive device attack in southern Afghanistan today.
Read more...

9. ISAF Joint Command Operational Update, May 4th
KABUL, Afghanistan (May 4, 2013) – An Afghan and coalition security force arrested a Taliban leader and two other insurgents during an operation in Marjeh district, Helmand province, today.
Read more...

Full texts of above linked: http://www.isaf.nato.int/article/isaf-releases/4.html
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bieramar



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PostPosted: Thu May 16, 2013 4:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

May 16th; Two (2) NATO ISAF service members and four (4) ISAF contracted civilians died following an IED attack in Kabul, Afghanistan today.

May 14th; One (1) NATO ISAF service member died today with wounds consequential to the IED attack in southern Afghanistan that killed three (3) ISAF service members yesterday.

To date 4,116 NATO ISAF military, Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) military, and ISAF/US-contracted civilians have been killed in Afghanistan.

SUPPORT U.S. TROOPS - BRING THEM HOME NOW ~ Veterans For Peace.

AND contact your Senators and Representatives to expedite their homecoming.
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auntmartymoo



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PostPosted: Thu May 16, 2013 8:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It is a shame President Obama escalated our number of troops in Afghanistan and lengthened the term of our commitment there.  

Good thing all the peace advocates voted against him in 2012.

No, wait...
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tsiya



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PostPosted: Thu May 16, 2013 9:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

He doesn't want the troops home, they thoroughly hate his guts.
Obama has been getting rid of high ranking officers who don't approve of his crap but the disgust in the ranks is something he can't do anything about.

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tsiya



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PostPosted: Thu May 16, 2013 9:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote






_________________
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"The urge to save humanity is almost always a false front for the urge to rule."
H. L. Mencken
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