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Thanksgiving
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puc reducks



Joined: 21 Nov 2010
Posts: 1250

PostPosted: Mon Nov 21, 2011 9:48 pm    Post subject:  Reply with quote

Hilarious, AMM!  Now I'd like to see if the source of "Marney's Way or The Highway" can be determined.  

~~~~~

Pizza is the most divisive food there is.

For example:  I WANT ANCHOVIES ON MINE!!!   Laughing
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scrutney
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Joined: 18 Nov 2010
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 22, 2012 12:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

thought i'd resurrect this thread instead of starting a new one.
it's been a strange year but i've got a lot to be thankful for, not the least of which are my family and friends.

my candidate for president lost but i didn't really like him anyway and honestly i don't feel all that badly about the way that things played out.

i pulled the plug on the cable box, and i'm thankful for that.

i polled the family on what delicacy we should feast upon for thanksgiving and the unanimous* choice (i didn't get a vote and there was a unanimous choice on that as well ) was:

meat loaf?
meat loaf. go figure.

happy thanksgiving bum rejects.

edited to add:
"where would willie mayes have been without jackie robinson..and where the hell would i have been, without you to lead the way?"...~dan bern.

good question...but being the youngest of the family, thank god i'll never have to ponder that question alone.

so here's a flip of the chapeau to the tuly important people in this world...family.

if god won't bless them...i will.


*coebul tells me that his family is a democracy as well...except that of the four of them...coe is the only one with four votes.
i don't believe him...i know mrs. coebul.

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bieramar



Joined: 19 Nov 2010
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Location: Taylor Ranch, NM

PostPosted: Thu Nov 22, 2012 2:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm super thankful to be enjoying another Thanksgiving - I've found that paying attention to the moment-to-moment positives which comprise 99% of my and my friends' lives, places the 1% of the 'squeaky wheel' headlines of doom and destruction in proper perspective.

Our family (2 humans, 2 canines) Thanksgiving dinner today is a centerpiece of an overnight slow-cooked whole acorn squash, surrounded by a medley of olive oil-tossed, oven-roasted red bell peppers, red and white onions, orange yams, green broccoli stems and flowers, Brussels sprouts, turnips + faux butter, salt and pepper + combination Mexican corn/wheat tortillos and several varieties of Moroccan hummus.

Italian Cupcake prosecco dinner wine, and Nicaraguan Flor de Cana rum with Costa Rican expresso for dessert.
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tsiya



Joined: 18 Nov 2010
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Location: Cabbage Hammock

PostPosted: Thu Nov 22, 2012 3:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That will give your dogs the shitz!
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"The urge to save humanity is almost always a false front for the urge to rule."
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tsiya



Joined: 18 Nov 2010
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Location: Cabbage Hammock

PostPosted: Thu Nov 22, 2012 6:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

WKRP "As God as my witness, I thought turkeys could fly" Thanksgiving

http://youtu.be/lf3mgmEdfwg
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"The urge to save humanity is almost always a false front for the urge to rule."
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bieramar



Joined: 19 Nov 2010
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Location: Taylor Ranch, NM

PostPosted: Sun Nov 24, 2013 9:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The First Thanksgiving - a preemptive post.

Translated excerpts from The Journey of Alvar Nez Cabeza De Vaca
Date: 1542

Overview:
Cabeza de Vaca, who lived from about 1490 to around 1557, was the first European to explore North America and leave a written record. His reports that great wealth lay north of Mexico led the Spanish to explore Arizona and New Mexico.
Cabeza de Vaca was a member of a Spanish expedition that set out to colonize Florida in 1527. Under attack from Florida's Indians, Cabeza de Vaca and a number of other men sailed a makeshift barge westward, hoping to find a Spanish settlement in Mexico. Along the way, the men became the first Europeans to cross the mouth of the Mississippi River.
Cabeza de Vaca and eighty Spanish castaways landed on Galveston Island, along the Texas coast. For the next eight years, he and other survivors travelled overland, living with various Indian tribes, sometimes as slaves and at times as shamans (religious healers). Disease and conflict with Indians killed all but four of the travelers: Cabeza de Vaca, Alonso del Castillo, Andres Dorantes, and Dorantes's slave, the first African to set foot in what is now the United States, a Moroccan Moor [sub-Saharan black African Muslim] converted to Christianity named Estevanico.

[1527, after grounding on Galveston Island]: The day we arrived there was the sixth of the month of November. After the people had eaten I sent Lope de Oviedo, who was the strongest and heartiest of all, to go to some trees nearby and climb to the top of one, examine the surroundings and the country in which we were. He did so and found we were on an island, and that the ground was hollowed out, as if cattle had gone over it, from which it seemed to him that the land belonged to Christians, and so he told us. I sent him again to look and examine more closely if there were any worn trails, and not to go too far so as not to run into danger. He went, found a footpath, followed it for about one-half league, and saw several Indian huts which stood empty because the Indians had gone out into the field.
He took away a cooking pot, a little dag and a few ruffs and turned back, but as he seemed to delay I sent two other Christians to look for him and find out what had happened.
They met him nearby and saw that three Indians, with bows and arrows, were following and calling to him, while he did the same to them by signs. So he came to where we were, the Indians remaining behind, seated on the beach. Half an hour after a hundred Indian archers joined them, and our fright was such that, whether tall or little, it made them appear giants to us. They stood still close to the first ones, near where we were.
We could not defend ourselves, as there were scarcely three of us who could stand on their feet. The inspector and I stepped forward and called them. They came, and we tried to quiet them the best we could and save ourselves, giving them beads and bells. Each one of them gave me an arrow in token of friendship, and by signs they gave us to understand that on the following morning they would come back with food, as then they had none.
The next day, at sunrise, which was the hour the Indians had given us to understand, they came as promised and brought us plenty of fish and some roots which they eat that taste like nuts, some bigger, some smaller, most of which are taken out of the water with much trouble.
In the evening they returned and brought us more fish and some of the same roots, and they brought their women and children to look at us. They thought themselves very rich with the little bells and beads we gave them, and thereafter visited us daily with the same things as before. As we saw ourselves provided with fish, roots, water and the other things we had asked for, we concluded to embark again and continue our voyage.
We lifted the barge out of the sand into which it had sunk ( for which purpose we all had to take off our clothes) and had great work to set her afloat, as our condition was such that much lighter things would have given us trouble.
Then we embarked. Two crossbow shots from shore a wave swept over us, we all got wet, and being naked and the cold very great, the oars dropped out of our hands. The next wave overturned the barge. The inspector and two others clung to her to save themselves, but the contrary happened; they got underneath the barge and were drowned.
The shore being very rough, the sea took the others and thrust them, half dead, on the beach of the same island again, less the three that had perished underneath the barge.
The rest of us, as naked as we had been born, had lost everything, and while it was not worth much, to us it meant a great deal. It was in November, bitterly cold, and we in such a state that every bone could easily be counted, and we looked like death itself. Of myself I can say that since the month of May I had not tasted anything but toasted maize, and even sometimes had been obliged to eat it raw. Although the horses were killed during the time the barges were built, I never could eat of them, and not ten times did I taste fish. This I say in order to explain and that any one might guess how we were off. On top of all this, a north wind arose, so that we were nearer death than life. It pleased Our Lord that, searching for the remnants of our former fire, we found wood with which we built big fires and then with many tears begged Our Lord for mercy and forgiveness of our sins. Every one of us pitied not only himself, but all the others whom he saw in the same condition.
At sunset the Indians, thinking we had not left, came to bring us food, but when they saw us in such a different attire from before and so strange-looking, they were so frightened as to turn back. I went to call them, and in great fear they came. I then gave them to understand by signs how we had lost a barge and three of our men had been drowned, while before them there lay two of our men dead, with the others about to go the same way.
Upon seeing the disaster we had suffered, our misery and distress, the Indians sat down with us and all began to weep out of compassion for our misfortune, and for more than half an hour they wept so loud and so sincerely that it could be heard far away.
Verily, to see beings so devoid of reason, untutored, so like unto brutes, yet so deeply moved by pity for us, it increased my feelings and those of others in my company for our own misfortune.
Still, seeing there was no remedy and that in any other way death was surer and nearer, I ... begged the Indians to take us to their dwellings, at which they showed great pleasure, telling us to tarry yet a little, but that they would do what we wished. Soon thirty of them loaded themselves with firewood and went to their lodges, which were far away, while we stayed with the others until it was almost dark. Then they took hold of us and carried us along hurriedly to where they lived.
Against the cold, and lest on the way some one of us might faint or die, they had provided four or five big fires on the road, at each one of which they warmed us. As soon as they saw we had regained a little warmth and strength they would carry us to the next fire with such haste that our feet barely touched the ground.
So we got to their dwellings, where we saw they had built a hut for us with many fires in it. About one hour after our arrival began to dance and to make a great celebration (which lasted the whole night), although there was neither pleasure, feast nor sleep in it for us, since we expected to be sacrificed. In the morning they again gave us fish and roots, and treated us so well that we became reassured, losing somewhat our apprehension of being butchered.
Above translation source:
http://www.pbs.org/weta/thewest/resources/archives/one/cabeza.htm

BUT things changed:
In the following linked passage from his journal, Cabeza de Vaca describes his party's finally meeting up with a group of Spaniards in Mexico--who were in the process of enslaving Indians.

http://www.digitalhistory.uh.edu/...textbook.cfm?smtID=3&psid=524
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scrutney
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 25, 2013 3:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

cabeza de vaca?
beef head?


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bieramar



Joined: 19 Nov 2010
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 25, 2013 3:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Actually "head of a cow" - a surname awarded to his peasant ancestor, raising him to the knighthood class, for his insurgent actions against the Muslims (Moors) who ruled the south half of the Spanish peninsula from 711 to 1492 CE (AD).  

After his attacks on the Moors his ancestor would leave a cow's head as a calling card.

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